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with nelson mandela. mr. swatwali, thank you for joining us. give us some thoughts, what it was like during the apartheid regime. tell us what it was like, eye specially on robben island in prison. >> well, let me first say that our people in south africa and the world have lost . >>> that's what we learned from nelson mandela. during the dark days with him on robben island. today he is seen as an icon of the world, whose teachings, as well as principles need to be embraced by all. he was embraced even by his own jailers, because he demonstrated that through the power of dialogue through the elements and two of reconciliation, people on different sides, former enemies, can come together. that's how -- we solve our intractable problems. we concluded that in order for us to create a new democratic society for a united and nonviolent south africa was to embrace all people. that was seen through the -- >> i have a pictures, mr. sexwale, of the cell. it's robben island. i think we'll be able to show our viewers, a cell where mr. nelson mandela spent so many years. there it is right there. awful
. your thoughts on nelson mandela. caller: mr. mandela was a man of peace. of forgiveness -- a man forgiveness. a man of inspiration to millions of people around the world. that the truly sad same cannot be said about the man who spoke about earlier today from the white house. noson mandela had divisiveness. he had no enemies. he had -- he did not desire to cause division. barack obama is low. nelson mandela -- host: thank you for your calls. lots of reactions from the former president, george w. bush issuing a statement. -- president obama shortly after the announcement of nelson mandela's death spoke to reporters on his thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela. >> at his trial in 1964, nelson mandela close to statement saying i have fought against white domination. i have fought against black domination. ahave cherished the ideas of democratic and free society in which all persons live together with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i will hope to live for and to achieve. if needs be, it is an idea for which i'm prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal, and m
the president of the south africa, mr. nelson mandela. [applause] >> your majesties, your royal highnesses, distinguished guests, comrades, and friends, today, all of us do, by our presence here, and by our celebrations in other parts of our country and the world confer glory and hope to newborn liberty. out of the experience of an extraordinary human disaster that lasted too long must be born a society of which all humanity will be proud. our daily deeds as ordinary south africans must produce an actual south african reality that will reinforce humanity's belief in justice, strengthen its confidence in the nobility of the human soul, and sustain all our hopes for a glorious life for all. all this we owe both to ourselves and to the peoples of the world who are so well represented here today. to my compatriots, i have no hesitation in saying that each one of us is as intimately attached to the soil of this beautiful country as are the famous jacaranda trees of pretoria and the mimosa trees of the bushveld. each time one of us touches the soil of this land, we feel a sense of personal renew
the generation of prisoners who were there with mr. mandela would simply not see a free south africa. and those who were in our 20s at the time, i thought by the time change came in south africa, we would be pretty old and not make a contribution to a democratic south africa. i thought it would be extremely bloody and conflict ridden. and we would inherit a country that would take time to heal and rebuild and just get people together again. i was convinced that it was never going to happen in -- in -- so soon. even by '85 i didn't think it would happen in the lifetime of many, many people who have played a good and leading role in building a democratic south africa. >> and nelson mandela was freed from prison in 1990 as inaugurated as president of south africa in 1994. thank you so much for joining us and reflecting on this important day. our deepest on dole lances to you and everyone in south africa on this huge, huge loss. he went on to become the ceo of the nelson mandela foundation, by the way. >>> joining us later today, i'll be edit sitting down and speaking with former president bill cli
want to show you the marquee back in 1990 when nelson mandela visited here. it says, mr. and mrs. a&m, welcome home. we love you. we love you. we love you. over the course of that visit to new york city, 750 people throughout the city saw him and of course, chris, you might remember that. mario cuomo was the governor, dinkins was the mayor and nelson mandela made a big splash here and big impression on new york when he visited here. >> i remember many said they never met anyone like nelson mandela. we'll check back in with you later on. >>> right now we get perspect e perspective, though, nelson mandela devoted himself to humanitarian work. sir richard branson worked with nelson mandela on many projects and helped him form a group called the elders. a very important part for nelson mandela to what should be his legacy. sir richard branson joins us now. thanks for joining us. great to have you on the show. i want to say first, nelson mandela was a personal friend as well as a role model and i am sorry for your loss this morning. but thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much.
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5